Book Imagine

10:14 PM

I started this post a couple days ago and have been working on it little by little, so it's gonna be a mix of thoughts from at least two different days. Hope it's not confusing :) On a COMPLETELY different note, the weather is so gorgeous today! It's sunny, but there's a cool breeze. And *sigh*, it's days like these that make me want to hug the universe. Sorry, weird I know. Lol.

First of all, I just counted how many books(fiction) I have in my bookcase right now-- 125. And that's not even counting extras that I don't really like or don't want to read for a while. I think I'm well I'm my way to the home "library" I've always wanted, huh. ;)

UPDATE: I NOW HAVE 131 BOOKS DUE TO A RECENT BOOK STORE VISIT ;) WHAT CAN I SAY? THEY CALL TO ME. AND THEY'RE CHEAP. THERE'S THAT TOO.

Looking at the rows of books in my bookcase, I thought, "How the heck would I decide which ones to bring if I had to live overseas for a year or so?" (it's a legitimate question for me because my mom has family overseas) And let me tell you, international flights don't exactly accommodate heavy packers. You're allowed one piece of luggage, one carry-on, and a personal item(a purse, small backpack,...an umbrella. yes, that example was on a website). Soooo...you can imagine that you probably wouldn't be able to take all your favorite books.

My question/imagine for you (and myself) is this: If you had to live overseas (and just for fun, imagine that the first language there is not English) for a year or two, what 15 books (I tried to do ten, but I just couldn't) would you absolutely take with you?

Here are mine:

First book in the Heist Society series. Love the team!

Ruby Red by Kerstin Gier (in case you couldn't see the picture too well). It is one of the best, I think, time-travel books I have ever read. And I actually haven't read that many so you might not wanna take my word for it. It's still a great book though :)

I don't know why, but I don't really like all the "Anne" books. My favorites, though, are the first one and this one. 

One of the reasons I love this book is because  it has a unique view point (a Chinese girl coming to America to study in college in the "olden days" when that was very rare) and because my mom is Chinese.
The Fifth of March by Ann Rinaldi. I like it pretty well. Probably because I have a weakness for historical fiction. Also, this book centers around the Boston Massacre for those of you interested.
Girl in Blue by Ann Rinaldi. Yes, another Rinaldi book :D The girl main character is seriously kick-butt. She runs away from home (from an almost forced-marriage) and joins the Union Army (think civil war) disguised as a boy. This story is really sad, but worth it.
Shadow of His Hand by Wendy Lawton. This is an amazing story about a young girl in Germany during Hitler's reign. She has absolute faith in God and his ability to guide her and provide for her. It's a real eye-opener.
If you haven't read this series (Gallagher Girls by Ally Carter), then you should. Immediately. I don't care if you borrow it from the library, buy it, borrow it from a friend, steal it (although that option might have negative consequences). You have to read it. The whole series is awesome because it's about GIRL SPIES. Can it get any cooler? I think not.
Refer to the explanation above. 
Can you tell I like this series? I wouldn't want it to be too obvious or anything.
Waterfall by Lisa T. Bergren. This is book from another time-traveling  series I discovered, only it has a few twists. 1) It's Christian (only little hints though), 2) you get healed of wounds when you time travel, and 3) I can't tell you because it would be more of a spoiler than the other two. Sorry not sorry. 
This is also Christian fiction. (Catwalk by Melody Carlson if you can't read the tiny type) It's also part of a series (I'm sensing a pattern here). What I like about it is that it shows how a Christian teenaged girl copes with different real-world situations, although they might be in a slightly not-gonna-happen-to-regular-teenagers scenario. 
The Diamond of Drury Lane by Julia Golding (she's british by the way). It targets a somewhat younger audience than what I usually read (around 13 yrs.), but the main character is spunky and she has loads of out-of-this-world adventures.
I had this "stage" where I read all things Amish fiction. Lots of times the only books I borrowed from the library were those Amish fictions that often had very similar plots and romance. Ooooh. I still like a good Amish fiction, I'm just not as infatuated as before. Why you ask? (I don't care if you didn't actually ask) Because there's something about horses and carriages and straw hats that fascinates me. 
The Two Princesses of Bamarre by Gail Carson Levine. This book  has a fairy tale feel, but I don't think it was based on any known fairy tales. At least not any that I have heard of. And what I liked about it was that it was un-cliche in every way. The shy girl is brunette, the fierce girl is blonde. The main character doesn't even fall in love with a handsome prince. 
And that, my readers, is my "Fifteen Books I Would Take If I Had To Move To Timbuktu" aka the fifteen books I would most likely take out of my bookcase if I were going somewhere where books were limited. The horror. 

                                              Hope you enjoyed,
                                                                         X





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